JCSMR Immunology Department Seminar Series: Shiraz and Syrah: the different lymphocyte lineage-specific roles of Aif

Dr Satyajit Rath, MB,BS, MD (Pathology), National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi, India.

My basic and post-graduate medical training was at the universities of Pune and Mumbai in India. My post-doctoral work was at the Haffkine Institute, Mumbai, India, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK, Brandeis University, Waltham, USA, and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, USA. I have been at National Institute of Immunology, Delhi since 1991.

The focus of ongoing programmes in our group is the physiological control of the generation and activation of T, B and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of the myeloid lineage. We use a variety of interlinked experimental systems and approaches for this, in association with many collaborators both within and outside NII. Our current projects are examining APCs and pathways involved in antigen presentation to MHC class I and class II-restricted T cells, and analysing the consequences of intracellular signal transduction modulation for both development and responses of T cells and myeloid cells using genetic as well as pharmacological tools. Here below are a few ongoing examples, along with the group members and collaborators involved in them.

In one approach, we are trying to elucidate the unique roles that individual death pathways play at different stages of the development and functioning of T cells. (Abhishek Das, Shalini Tanwar and Jasneet Kaur Khalsa in collaboration with Anna George and Vineeta Bal at NII, Apurva Sarin at NCBS, Bangalore, India, and Jeannine Durdik at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, USA).

In a second approach, we are trying to understand how the dynamics of MHC and T cell receptor molecules on interacting T cells and APCs are controlled, and how these controls regulate the functional responses of T cells. (Rupali Gund and Abhishek Das in collaboration with Anna George and Vineeta Bal at NII, and Satyajit Mayor at NCBS, Bangalore, India).

In a third approach, we are identifying immune mechanisms possibly contributing to the eventual outcome of chronic parasitic diseases caused by protozoans of Leishmania species and metazoans of filarial species, using mouse model systems. (Savit Prabhu (THSTI) in collaboration with Anna George and Vineeta Bal at NII, Uma Chandra Mouli Natchu at THSTI, Gurgaon, Tushar Vaidya at CCMB, Hyderabad, India, Balachandran Ravindran at ILS, Bhubaneswar, India, and Ranjan Sen at the NIA-NIH, Baltimore, USA).

In a fourth approach, we are dissecting the roles of quantitative modifiers of immune signal transduction pathways, ranging from proteasomal components to tyrosine kinases, in controlling the development and functioning of myeloid and lymphoid cells. (Shalini Tanwar and Rupali Gund in collaboration with Anna George and Vineeta Bal at NII).

In a fifth approach, we are characterising the diversity and stability of immunocyte subpopulation phenotypes in human peripheral blood and their correlation with various states of immune dysfunction in neonates. (Deepak Rathore and Savit Prabhu (THSTI) in collaboration with Anna George and Vineeta Bal at NII, Uma Chandra Mouli Natchu, Nitya Wadhwa and Shinjini Bhatnagar at THSTI, Gurgaon, and Ranjan Sen at the NIA-NIH, Baltimore, USA).

Date & time

12–1pm 10 April 2013

Location

Seminar Room 2, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Building 131, Garran Road, ANU

Contacts

 Esmee Weil
 +61 2 612 52596

Updated:  23 November 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director, JCSMR/Page Contact:  Web Manager